Loading
Loading

Results

Sort By:  1-10 of 13 (2 pages)
Results per page:
         

Bicycle  

Translated by

Ah-Jeong Kim

and

R. B. Graves

~playauthor~Written by~ Tae-sŏk O , Ah-Jeong Kim , R. B. Graves ~playauthor~Translated by~ Ah-Jeong Kim , R. B. Graves

Methuen Drama, 2014

Bloomsbury Publishing

Playtext

Scenes: 10, Roles: Total (18), Female (5), Male (12), Unassigned (1)

6

Image
Summary
...Deals with the brutal burning of 127 suspected anti-communists in a South Korean village by retreating soldiers of North Korean People's Liberation Army in 1950.  ...

Churchyard

R. Chris Hassel

R.Chris Hassel, Jr. is Professor of English Emeritus at Vanderbilt University, USA. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

Shakespeare’s Religious Language : A Dictionary

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

Books

2

...(A) The grounds of a church, including the graveyard.(B) Mamillius begins his unfinished winter’s tale ‘There was a man . . . Dwelt by a churchyard’ (WT 2.1.29–30). Menenius speaks metaphorically (and anachronistically) of Coriolanus’...

Body

R. Chris Hassel

R.Chris Hassel, Jr. is Professor of English Emeritus at Vanderbilt University, USA. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

Shakespeare’s Religious Language : A Dictionary

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

Books

4

... the graves of our bodies; and the body, which, in the best vigour thereof, was but the grave of the soule, we over-love’ (7: 298).(B) Isabella responds to Angelo’s unlawful proposition that she have the ‘sweet uncleanness’ of sex with him, ‘I...

Spirit2 (also Sprite)

R. Chris Hassel

R.Chris Hassel, Jr. is Professor of English Emeritus at Vanderbilt University, USA. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

Shakespeare’s Religious Language : A Dictionary

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

Books

3

... than to the soul; sometimes it refers exclusively to the soul; sometimes it means both at once. (B) Puck speaks of midnight as ‘the time of night / That the graves, all gaping wide, / Every one lets forth his sprite,...

Worm1

R. Chris Hassel

R.Chris Hassel, Jr. is Professor of English Emeritus at Vanderbilt University, USA. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

Shakespeare’s Religious Language : A Dictionary

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

Books

2

...Because worms are so closely associated with the decomposition of the human body in the grave, they are frequently named in passages considering human mortality and the short-sighted human privileging of body over soul.SON 146 speaks...

The End

R. M. Christofides

Roger Christofides is Senior Lecturer at Huddersfield University, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

Shakespeare and the Apocalypse : Visions of Doom from Early Modern Tragedy to Popular Culture

Continuum, 2012

Books

2

... their graves to the sound of horns so loud even the ears of the dead bleed. Maybe you are one of these zombies, soil still in your mouth, body withered and decayed, flesh worm-eaten and falling from your bones. You wish you said more prayers...

parley

Christopher R. Wilson

Christopher R.Wilson is Professor in the Department of Music at the University of Hull, UK. He has published on English music/words topics from the late medieval period to the 20th century. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
and

Michela Calore

Michela Calore is an independent scholar who specializes in the staging conditions of the Elizabethan theatre. She has a particular interest in the Rose theatre and the repertoire of the Admiral's Men, and has published articles on the language and staging of plays written in the 1580s and the 1590s. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

Music in Shakespeare : A Dictionary

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2005

Books

2

... their dead.(B) There are several explicit indications that trumpets must be used for parleys in the Shakespeare canon, for instance when at Shrewsbury ‘the trumpet sounds a parley’ (1H4 4.3.29.SD) is followed by the entry of Sir Walter Blunt who...

Hamlet and the Living Dead

R. M. Christofides

Roger Christofides is Senior Lecturer at Huddersfield University, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

Shakespeare and the Apocalypse : Visions of Doom from Early Modern Tragedy to Popular Culture

Continuum, 2012

Books

2

... But the promise of a stability to come abides. A vanitas similar to the warped, anamorphic skull that skews across Hans Holbein the Younger's famous 1533 painting ‘The Ambassadors’, Yorick's dirt-filled skull rises from the grave to introduce...

Macbeth and the Angels of Doom

R. M. Christofides

Roger Christofides is Senior Lecturer at Huddersfield University, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

Shakespeare and the Apocalypse : Visions of Doom from Early Modern Tragedy to Popular Culture

Continuum, 2012

Books

2

... when McFly inadvertently plays Chuck Berry's 1958 track ‘Johnny B. Goode’ three years prior to its actual release. Band member Marvin Berry immediately calls his cousin to notify him of this new, groundbreaking sound, a twist...

M

Trevor R. Griffiths

Formerly Professor of Theatre Studies at London Metropolitan University, Trevor R. Griffiths is currently a visiting professor in Humanities at the University of Hertfordshire. His Theatre Guide: A Comprehensive A-Z of the World's Best Plays and Playwrights (1988/1991) is published by A&C Black. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

The Theatre Guide : A Comprehensive A-Z of the World's Best Plays and Playwrights

Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2003

Books

2

... and her middle-aged daughter are locked in a dance of insult and abuse as the mother intervenes to destroy the daughter’s hopes of romance. A Skull in Connemara literally involves digging up the past, as a gravediggerclearing old graves...