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The Jew of Malta

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is Professor of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Literature at the University of Queensland, Australia, and Director of the UQ Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe 1100-1800). He is the author of Shakespeare’s Individualism (2010) and Literature and Degree in Renaissance England: Nashe, Bourgeois Tragedy Shakespeare (1994), and co-editor, with David Bevington, of The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque (1998). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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English Renaissance Tragedy : Ideas of Freedom

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

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...Part of the appeal of many of the plays discussed in this book resides in their representation of a certain anarchic, amoral energy, for example in Shakespeare’s Aaron the Moor, whose radically anti-Christian thinking we noted in Part One...

Tamburlaine, Parts One and Two

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is Professor of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Literature at the University of Queensland, Australia, and Director of the UQ Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe 1100-1800). He is the author of Shakespeare’s Individualism (2010) and Literature and Degree in Renaissance England: Nashe, Bourgeois Tragedy Shakespeare (1994), and co-editor, with David Bevington, of The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque (1998). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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English Renaissance Tragedy : Ideas of Freedom

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

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...In Part One we noticed how tragedies of the period debunked or demystified power. Like other plays of Marlowe, discussed below, both parts of Tamburlaine are obsessed with the overturning of hierarchies – social, cosmic, ethical. The hero...

Edward II

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is Professor of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Literature at the University of Queensland, Australia, and Director of the UQ Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe 1100-1800). He is the author of Shakespeare’s Individualism (2010) and Literature and Degree in Renaissance England: Nashe, Bourgeois Tragedy Shakespeare (1994), and co-editor, with David Bevington, of The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque (1998). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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English Renaissance Tragedy : Ideas of Freedom

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

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...English Renaissance tragedies routinely depicted acts of extreme violence: the gouging out of Gloucester’s eyes in King Lear, the suicides of Bajazeth and Zabina in Tamburlaine. The end of Marlowe’s play about the downfall of the English...

Arden of Faversham

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is Professor of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Literature at the University of Queensland, Australia, and Director of the UQ Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe 1100-1800). He is the author of Shakespeare’s Individualism (2010) and Literature and Degree in Renaissance England: Nashe, Bourgeois Tragedy Shakespeare (1994), and co-editor, with David Bevington, of The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque (1998). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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English Renaissance Tragedy : Ideas of Freedom

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

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...Tragedy’s sensitivity to social hierarchy and inequality is illustrated in the anonymous Arden of Faversham (a play in which it is now reasonably supposed Shakespeare had a hand in). Arden is one of a group of Renaissance tragedies...

Gorboduc

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is Professor of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Literature at the University of Queensland, Australia, and Director of the UQ Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe 1100-1800). He is the author of Shakespeare’s Individualism (2010) and Literature and Degree in Renaissance England: Nashe, Bourgeois Tragedy Shakespeare (1994), and co-editor, with David Bevington, of The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque (1998). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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English Renaissance Tragedy : Ideas of Freedom

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

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...An early instance of the political focus of English Renaissance tragedy is Gorboduc, a collaborative effort by Thomas Norton and Thomas Sackville first performed at Christmas in 1561, and, later, at the court of Elizabeth...

Introduction

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is Professor of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Literature at the University of Queensland, Australia, and Director of the UQ Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe 1100-1800). He is the author of Shakespeare’s Individualism (2010) and Literature and Degree in Renaissance England: Nashe, Bourgeois Tragedy Shakespeare (1994), and co-editor, with David Bevington, of The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque (1998). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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English Renaissance Tragedy : Ideas of Freedom

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

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...Why read the works of Shakespeare and his contemporaries for their political or social meanings? Even if we allow that plays like Hamlet or King Lear deserve our attention because of the ways they have influenced literature...

Hamlet

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is Professor of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Literature at the University of Queensland, Australia, and Director of the UQ Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe 1100-1800). He is the author of Shakespeare’s Individualism (2010) and Literature and Degree in Renaissance England: Nashe, Bourgeois Tragedy Shakespeare (1994), and co-editor, with David Bevington, of The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque (1998). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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English Renaissance Tragedy : Ideas of Freedom

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

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...Part of the energy of tragedy in this period is its cynical, debunking tone, which is itself intellectually liberating. Often such a tone is to be found in the mouths of villainous, if charismatic, characters – Marlowe’s Tamburlaine...

The Tragic Genre

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is Professor of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Literature at the University of Queensland, Australia, and Director of the UQ Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe 1100-1800). He is the author of Shakespeare’s Individualism (2010) and Literature and Degree in Renaissance England: Nashe, Bourgeois Tragedy Shakespeare (1994), and co-editor, with David Bevington, of The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque (1998). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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English Renaissance Tragedy : Ideas of Freedom

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

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...My focus is Renaissance tragedy. But ‘tragedy’ of course is a much older form of drama, first appearing among the Greeks and associated with the names of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides – though it is arguable that a tragic way...

King Lear

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is Professor of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Literature at the University of Queensland, Australia, and Director of the UQ Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe 1100-1800). He is the author of Shakespeare’s Individualism (2010) and Literature and Degree in Renaissance England: Nashe, Bourgeois Tragedy Shakespeare (1994), and co-editor, with David Bevington, of The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque (1998). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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English Renaissance Tragedy : Ideas of Freedom

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

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...King Lear displays an extraordinary speculative freedom: it is a laboratory for testing out new ideas. Characters repeatedly ask general questions, and make general statements, about the nature of the world they find themselves in – about...

Freedom, Tyranny and Order in the English Renaissance

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is Professor of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Literature at the University of Queensland, Australia, and Director of the UQ Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe 1100-1800). He is the author of Shakespeare’s Individualism (2010) and Literature and Degree in Renaissance England: Nashe, Bourgeois Tragedy Shakespeare (1994), and co-editor, with David Bevington, of The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque (1998). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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English Renaissance Tragedy : Ideas of Freedom

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

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...As I have said, English Renaissance tragedy takes up a range of questions to do with the concept of human freedom. We have seen that tragedy has traditionally concerned itself with both unavoidable ills – questions of fate and mortality –...