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SNAPSHOT #13

Encountering Ensemble

Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2013

Books

...The Suzuki Actor Training Method (SATM) was developed by Japanese director Suzuki Tadashi and his company the Waseda Little Theatre from 1972 onwards in an attempt to apply the physical qualities of traditional Japanese theatre (No...

Between Radical Adaptation and Strategic Adaptability: Ki Catur ‘Benyek’ Kuncoro in Conversation with Miguel Escobar

Theatre and Adaptation: Return, Rewrite, Repeat

Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2014

Books

...This interview was conducted in Indonesian, rather than Javanese, upon the artist’s request, and was translated into English by the author. Indonesian naming practices vary greatly, but many Javanese people do not have a family name. Second...

Conservative Adaptation in Japanese Noh Theatre: Udaka Michishige in Conversation with Diego Pellecchia

Theatre and Adaptation: Return, Rewrite, Repeat

Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2014

Books

...Introduction How does the notion of ‘adaptation’ apply to a classical theatre genre where language, dramatic structure, music, and mise en scène are prescribed by a canon? Can this English word be used invariably to describe works...

Shakespeare in Japanese (II): Kinoshita Junji

Tetsuo Kishi

Tetsuo Kishi is Professor Emeritus of English at Kyoto University and was President of The Shakespeare Society of Japan (1999-2001) Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Graham Bradshaw

Graham Bradshaw teaches at Chuo University and is editor of The Shakespeare International Yearbook. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Shakespeare in Japan

Bloomsbury Academic, 2005

Books

...In abstract terms the career of Kinoshita Junji looks nearly identical with that of Fukuda Tsuneari. Born in 1914, Kinoshita is only two years junior to Fukuda. They both majored in English literature at the University of Tokyo when...

Yukio Ninagawa

Brook, Hall, Ninagawa, Lepage : Great Shakespeareans Volume XVIII

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2013

Books

...Why do you dress me / In borrowed robes?In one of the landmark twentieth-century productions of Macbeth, a gigantic set resembling a butsudan Buddhist household altar takes up the entire stage, and the massive shutters are opened and closed...

Shakespeare and the Japanese Stage

Tetsuo Kishi

Tetsuo Kishi is Professor Emeritus of English at Kyoto University and was President of The Shakespeare Society of Japan (1999-2001) Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Graham Bradshaw

Graham Bradshaw teaches at Chuo University and is editor of The Shakespeare International Yearbook. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Shakespeare in Japan

Bloomsbury Academic, 2005

Books

...Producing Shakespeare in Japan, like translating Shakespeare into Japanese, has never been easy or simple. Only the hopelessly naïve and optimistic, whether they are Japanese or non-Japanese, would fail to realize what a daunting task...

Shakespeare and Japanese Literature

Tetsuo Kishi

Tetsuo Kishi is Professor Emeritus of English at Kyoto University and was President of The Shakespeare Society of Japan (1999-2001) Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Graham Bradshaw

Graham Bradshaw teaches at Chuo University and is editor of The Shakespeare International Yearbook. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Shakespeare in Japan

Bloomsbury Academic, 2005

Books

...Fukuda Tsuneari’s Horatio’s Dairy is not the only work of Japanese literature which was inspired by Hamlet. It is not the best known either. Shakespeare’s play became the source of a number of novels and short stories produced...

Akira Kurosawa

Mark Thornton Burnett

Mark Thornton Burnett is Professor of Renaissance Studies at Queen’s University, Belfast, UK, and Director of the Kenneth Branagh Archive. His books include Shakespeare, Film, Fin de Siècle (Palgrave, 2000) and Screening Shakespeare in the Twenty-First Century (EUP, 2006). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Welles, Kozintsev, Kurosawa, Zeffirelli Volume Volume XVII

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2013

Books

...Akira Kurosawa (1910–98) is rightly celebrated as one of Japan’s most important, exciting, inventive and accomplished film-makers. The director of thirty films across a long and productive career, Kurosawa has been extolled for the ways...

‘Our Language of Love’

Tetsuo Kishi

Tetsuo Kishi is Professor Emeritus of English at Kyoto University and was President of The Shakespeare Society of Japan (1999-2001) Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Shakespeare and the Language of Translation : Revised Edition

Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2012

Books

...‘I love you’ is unspoken / In our language of love.I wonder how many readers remember the French musical of the 1950s, Irma la Douce, the story of Nestor, a young law student, and Irma, a tart with a heart of gold. They meet in a seedy...

Shakespeare and Japanese Film: Kurosawa Akira

Tetsuo Kishi

Tetsuo Kishi is Professor Emeritus of English at Kyoto University and was President of The Shakespeare Society of Japan (1999-2001) Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and

Graham Bradshaw

Graham Bradshaw teaches at Chuo University and is editor of The Shakespeare International Yearbook. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

Shakespeare in Japan

Bloomsbury Academic, 2005

Books

...The classic status of Kurosawa’s first and greatest Shakespeare film – Kumonosujo, or Throne of Blood (the literal translation of the original title is The Cobweb Castle) (1957) – has been accepted for so long that it is a shock to discover...