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  • Elizabethan and Jacobean tragedy
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Mashing it Up

Andrew Tidmarsh

Andrew Tidmarsh is theatre and film director, writer and teacher. He has taught this practical approach to genre to writers, directors and actors at RADA, Goldsmiths, and Drama Centre at undergraduate and postgraduate level. He has directed in UK, Germany, Canada and Philippines, and is the director of an annual new writing festival at the Soho Theatre in London. He regularly teaches in Canada and Dubai. His book An Attitude for Acting will be published by Nick Hern books in 2011. Andrew Tidmarsh is a theatre director, film-maker and teacher. He has taught at leading drama schools and currently runs the Foundation course at RADA. He has directed work at Soho Theatre, Wimbledon Studio, Shakespeare's Globe and Jermyn Street Theatre. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Genre : A Guide to Writing for Stage and Screen

Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2014

Books

...The excessive nature of Jacobean Tragedy is what makes it fun. It is always violent, graphic and bloody, and always in some dark way deeply entertaining. The excess exceeds our expectation and often our limits of what is bearable...

‘Orpheus with his lute’: Symbolic persons

Christopher R. Wilson

Christopher R.Wilson is Professor in the Department of Music at the University of Hull, UK. He has published on English music/words topics from the late medieval period to the 20th century. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Shakespeare’s Musical Imagery

Bloomsbury Academic, 2011

Books

...At the beginning of act 3 in All Is True (Henry VIII), Shakespeare’s exact contribution to The Famous History of the Life of King Henry the Eight as it appeared in F is uncertain. For a long time, critics and editors have...

‘The wheel is come full circle’: origins and new directions

Yvonne Griggs

Yvonne Griggs is Lecturer in Media and Communications at the University of New England, Australia. Her research interests include adaptation studies, screenwriting, Shakespeare on screen and neo-Victorian metafiction. She is the author of the book Screen Adaptations: Shakespeare’s King Lear (Methuen Drama, 2009). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Screen Adaptations Shakespeare’s King Lear : The Relationship between Text and Film

Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2009

Books

...Recycled narratives King Lear draws upon an amalgamation of existing narratives, and has been interpreted as both a redemptive morality tale and a vision of apocalyptic doom. Throughout its performance history, it has...

Act 5

Amy Scott-Douglass

Amy Scott-Douglas is an Assistant Professor in the English department at Marymount University, outside of Washington, DC. Her scholarship on Shakespeare has appeared in Shakespeare’s After Shakespeare: An Encyclopedia of the Bard in Mass Media and Popular Culture, Shakespeare the Movie Part II, The Edinburgh Companion to Shakespeare and the Arts, and Cambridge World Shakespeare Encyclopedia. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Shakespeare Inside : The Bard Behind Bars

Bloomsbury Academic, 2007

Books

...A Visit with Warden Larry Chandler One of the most talented actors from amongst Trounstine's alumnae is Rhonda, the woman who played Portia in the 1988 Framingham production of The Merchant of Venice. In her book Shakespeare Behind...

How Can Act 5 Forget Lear and Cordelia?

Shakespeare Up Close : Reading Early Modern Texts

Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2012

Books

...235240Every time I read King Lear I am startled by the moment when the characters recognise they have forgotten Lear and Cordelia. Kenneth Muir’s Arden 2 edition suggests that this forgetting should not be surprising because ‘there...

Aaron Ascendant

Eric S. Mallin

Eric S. Mallin is Associate Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin, USA. He is the author of Inscribing the Time: Shakespeare and the End of Elizabethan England (Berkeley: U of California P, 1995) Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Godless Shakespeare

Bloomsbury Academic, 2007

Books

...Aaron Only by contemplating the death of Catholicism is it possible to curb evil in the world. No, really. Here is Second Goth, explaining his discovery of the villain of Titus Andronicus: Renowmed Lucius, from our troops I...

A tale of adaptation

Courtney Lehmann

Courtney Lehmann is the Tully Knoles Professor of the Humanities and Professor of English and Film Studies and the Director of the Humanities Scholars Program at University of the Pacific in Stockton, California. Notable works include: Shakespeare Remains: Theater to Film, Early Modern to Postmodern (2002); Spectacular Shakespeare: Critical Theory and Popular Cinema (2002); The Reel Shakespeare: Alternative Cinema and Theory (2002); Screen Adaptations: Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet (2010); Great Shakespeareans, Volume XVII (2013) and a new edition of King John and Henry VIII (2015). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Screen Adaptations: Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet : The Relationship Between Text and Film

Bloomsbury Methuen Drama, 2010

Books

...Four hundred years before Baz Luhrmann’s 1996 film adaptation of Romeo + Juliet debuted at number one, Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet was performed – as the First Quarto informs us – ‘with great applause’. Despite its obvious flaws...

Afterword‘ Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say’

Paul Edmondson

Paul Edmondson is Head of Research and Knowledge for The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and a priest in The Church of England. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Shakespeare and I

Continuum, 2012

Books

...After their Midsummer Night adventures the four lovers – Demetrius, Hermia, Helena and Lysander – try to piece together what has befallen them. They all perceive something just beyond their reach.All four of them experience different ways...

Antony and Cleopatra

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is Professor of Shakespeare and English Renaissance Literature at the University of Queensland, Australia, and Director of the UQ Node of the ARC Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotions (Europe 1100-1800). He is the author of Shakespeare’s Individualism (2010) and Literature and Degree in Renaissance England: Nashe, Bourgeois Tragedy Shakespeare (1994), and co-editor, with David Bevington, of The Politics of the Stuart Court Masque (1998). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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English Renaissance Tragedy : Ideas of Freedom

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2015

Books

...In King Lear, freedom figured as both an existential problem (is suffering ineradicable, simply a part of human life itself?) and a political and social one (has the elite ruled for the sake of its own selfish interests, ‘ta’en / Too little...

The Critical Backstory

The Spanish Tragedy : A Critical Reader

Bloomsbury Arden Shakespeare, 2016

Books

...The beginnings The critical history of The Spanish Tragedy is bookended by popularity. Kyd’s play was an instant success in the late 1580s and was widely known to audiences for decades after its first performances...