Shakespeare in the Theatre

Plays

Shakespeare in the Theatre: Nicholas Hytner

Bloomsbury Publishing

Part of the series Shakespeare in the Theatre, this book examines the work of renowned theatre director Nicholas Hytner (Artistic Director of the National Theatre from 2003-2015). Featuring case studies of Hytner's Shakespeare productions and interviews with actors, designers, directors and other practitioners with whom Hytner has worked, it explores Hytner's own productions of Shakespeare's plays within their respective socio-cultural contexts and the context of Hytner's other directing work, and examines his working practices and the impact of his Artistic directorship on the centrality of Shakespeare within the repertoire of the National Theatre.

'The book will be extremely useful for anybody studying, acting and directing Shakespeare and of immense value to future theatre historians.' – Mature Times

Shakespeare in the Theatre: The American Shakespeare Center

Bloomsbury Publishing

The original Blackfriars closed its doors in the 1640s, ending over half-a-century of performances by men and boys. In 2001, in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, it opened once again. The reconstructed Blackfriars, home to the American Shakespeare Center, represents an old playhouse for the new millennium and therefore symbolically registers the permanent revolution in the performance of Shakespeare. Time and again, the industry refreshes its practices by rediscovering its own history. This book assesses how one American company has capitalised on history and in so doing has forged one of its own to become a major influence in contemporary Shakespearean theatre.

Each volume in the Shakespeare in the Theatre series examines a director or theatre company who has made a significant contribution to Shakespeare production and the aesthetic and socio-political contexts of their work.

Pointing to the range of people, artistic practices and cultural phenomena that make meaning in the theatre, the series de-centres Shakespeare from within Shakespeare studies, and provides an unrivalled way of perceiving the performance of his work.