Screen Adaptations

Plays

Screen Adaptations: Great Expectations

Bloomsbury Publishing

Literature and film studies students will find plenty of material to support their courses and essay writing on how the film versions provide different readings of the original text.

Focusing on David Lean's film of Great Expectations, the book discusses: the literary text in its historical context, key themes and dominant readings of the text, how the text is adapted for screen and how adaptations have changed our reading of the original text. There are numerous excerpts from the literary text, screenplays and shooting scripts, with suggestions for comparison. The book also features quotations from authors, screenwriters, directors, critics and others linked with the chosen film and text.

'[The Screen Adaptations series] offers some meaty ideas to film studies students.' The Stage

Screen Adaptations: Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

Bloomsbury Publishing

The study of literature on screen is a growing area of study in schools and universities. Many students have to produce critical essays comparing the novel and film versions of a particular text. The Screen Adaptations series offers a wealth of study material: from the literary context of the original work, through to thought-provoking comparisons of the screen versions, critical commentary and the afterlife of the films.

Pride and Prejudice is a classic piece of literature and any new adaptation is a major event. With several well-known TV and film versions available (featuring stars such as Keira Knightley) as well as a Bollywood version, discussions around how these films interpret the story, themes and characters is a popular classroom choice for students and teachers alike.

This book provides a rich source of material to help students understand and write about the reciprocal relationship between film and literature. It offers in-depth analysis of the various screen versions and alternative `readings' as well as critical insight and an interview with writer Andrew Davies, best known for his 1995 BBC adaptation. Following from Shakespeare, Jane Austen on screen is now an established part of literary studies and the volume will conclude with a survey of the growing body of literature in the field.

'[The Screen Adaptations series] offers some meaty ideas to film studies students.' The Stage

Screen Adaptations: Romeo and Juliet

Bloomsbury Publishing

The Screen Adaptations series provides an in-depth look at how classic pieces of literature have been adapted for screen. It assesses the ways in which alternative screen interpretations offer up different readings of the original text as well as the methodologies and approaches of filmmakers. Each title in the series collects together a vast array of study material, critical insight and thought-provoking comparisons - from literary context to the afterlife of the screen versions.

Shakespeare on Film is a huge area of study and Romeo and Juliet is one of his most popular plays with many teachers using film versions as a way of approaching the text. Focusing in the main on West Side Story and Baz Lurhmann's Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet, this is a unique and comprehensive insight into the adaptation process providing a vital study aid for students.

'[The Screen Adaptations series] offers some meaty ideas to film studies students.' The Stage

Screen Adaptations: Shakespeare’s Hamlet

Bloomsbury Publishing

Hamlet is the most often produced play in the western literary canon, and a fertile global source for film adaptation. Samuel Crowl, a noted scholar of Shakespeare on film, unpacks the process of adapting from text to screen through concentrating on two sharply contrasting film versions of Hamlet by Laurence Olivier (1948) and Kenneth Branagh (1996). The films' socio-political contexts are explored, and the importance of their screenplay, film score, setting, cinematography and editing examined.

Offering an analysis of two of the most important figures in the history of film adaptations of Shakespeare, this study seeks to understand a variety of cinematic approaches to translating Shakespeare's “words, words, words” into film's particular grammar and rhetoric

Screen Adaptations: Shakespeare's King Lear

Bloomsbury Publishing

This close study of film adaptations of King Lear looks at several different versions (mainstream, art-house and cinematic `offshoots') and discusses: the literary text in its historical context, key themes and dominant readings of the text, how the text is adapted for screen and how adaptations have changed our reading of the original text.

There are many references to the literary text and screenplays and the book also features quotations from directors and critics. There is plenty of discursive material here to support student work on both film and literature courses.

'[The Screen Adaptations series] offers some meaty ideas to film studies students.' The Stage

Screen Adaptations: The Tempest

Bloomsbury Publishing

Literature and film studies students will find plenty of material to support their courses and essay writing on how the film versions provide different readings of the original text.

Focusing on numerous film versions, from Percy Stow's 1908 adaptation to Peter Greenaway's Prospero's Books, the book discusses: the literary text in its historical context, key themes and dominant readings of the text, how the text is adapted for screen and how adaptations have changed our reading of the original text. There are numerous excerpts from the literary text, screenplays and shooting scripts, with suggestions for comparison.

The book also features quotations from authors, screenwriters, directors, critics and others linked with the chosen film and text.

'Lisa Hopkins' Screen Adaptations: The Tempest is accessible and insightful...this book offers some valuable provocations into the screen afterlife of the Bard's 'late Romance'.' Journal of Adaptation in Film and Performance

Screen Adaptations: To Kill a Mockingbird

Bloomsbury Publishing

To Kill a Mockingbird is an immensely important work of literature which is studied worldwide. Literature and film adaptations studies students will find plenty of material to support their courses and essay writing on how the film versions provide different readings of the original text.

Focussing on several film versions and adaptations, the book discusses: the literary text in its historical context, key themes and dominant readings of the text, how the text is adapted for screen and how adaptations have changed our reading of the original text. There are many references to the literary text and screenplays and the book also features quotations from directors, critics and others linked with the chosen film and text.

"I recommend the book as an inspiring read not only for film buffs but for anyone reading or teaching the novel, regardless of educational level." Southwest Journal of Cultures (May 2009)

[The Screen Adaptations series] offers some meaty ideas to film studies students. The Stage

Providing students with much supportive material for courses/essays, each title focuses on regularly-studied literary works, examining their literary context, dominant themes/readings and their interpretation in film/s, including critical responses.