Plays by Chloë Moss

Christmas is Miles Away  

Nick Hern Books
Type: Text

Chloë Moss's play Christmas Is Miles Away is a coming-of-age drama set in Manchester at the end of the 1980s. It was first performed at The Studio, Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester, on 2 November 2005, transferring to the Bush Theatre, London, in February 2006.

The play's action takes place in Manchester between February 1989 and October 1991. The play opens as best friends Christie and Luke, both sixteen, are camping out in a field not far from their homes. Christie is consumed with anxiety about whether he can pluck up the courage to ask Julie Bridges out on a date. Luke, brasher and more confident, offers to step in on his behalf and, in so doing, starts off a chain of events that will force a wedge between the two boys.

The premiere production was directed by Sarah Frankcom and designed by Jamie Todd. It was performed by David Judge (as Christie), Paul Stocker (as Luke) and Georgia Taylor (as Julie).

The Gatekeeper  

Nick Hern Books
Type: Text

Chloë Moss's The Gatekeeper is a darkly comic play about the disintegration of a family get-together. It was first performed at the Royal Exchange Theatre, Manchester, on 8 February 2012.

The play is set in a holiday cottage in the English Lake District. 35-year-old business woman Stacey celebrates her birthday by hiring the cottage where she and her family used to holiday when she was a child. She thinks it's just going to be her and her mum and dad, Julia and Mike, but there are surprise guests: her brother Rob (age 38), a drifter apparently recently returned from Thailand, and his new girlfriend Angela, who was Stacey's teenage friend. The family's attempts to keep up appearances soon fall by the wayside as secrets are revealed.

The premiere production was directed by Tessa Walker and designed by Chloe Lamford. It was performed by Helen Carter (as Angela), Kate Coogan (as Stacey), Tricia Kelly (as Julia), Nick Moss (as Rob) and Ian Redford (as Mike).

How Love Is Spelt  

Nick Hern Books
Type: Text

Chloë Moss's play How Love Is Spelt is a playful tale of growing up and finding yourself in the city. It was first performed at The Bush Theatre, London, on 1 October 2004.

The play is set in a small, sparsely furnished bedsit in London occupied by twenty-year-old Peta, who has recently moved to the city from Liverpool. Rejecting the comfort and security of her home town, she's looking for excitement and adventure in the big city. But going solo isn't quite so simple, especially when there's a constant reminder of the life you're trying to escape. Over the course of the play, Peta has a series of fleeting and almost anonymous encounters with other lonely, lost souls. With each new encounter Peta flirts with what might have been... but can you ever really run away from yourself?

The premiere production was directed by Julie Anne Robinson and designed by Nathalie Gibbs. It was performed by Kay Lyon (as Peta), Joe Armstrong, Roger Evans, Petra Letang, Joanne Pearce and Colin Tierney.

This Wide Night  

Nick Hern Books
Type: Text

Chloë Moss's play This Wide Night is a drama about two women trying to start their lives over again after their release from prison. It was first performed at Soho Theatre, London, in August 2008, in a production by Clean Break, the theatre, education and new writing company that works with women whose lives have been affected by the criminal justice system.

This revised version of the play was first performed at Soho Theatre on 29 November 2009.

The play is set in a cramped bedsit belonging to Marie, age thirty. A knock at the door heralds the arrival of Lorraine, age fifty, a woman Marie knew while they were both in prison. Lorraine has just been released, and has come straight to Marie’s. On the inside, the two women used to share everything; but the friendship that once protected them now threatens to smother the fragile freedom they have found.

This Wide Night won the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize in 2009.

The premiere production was directed by Lucy Morrison and designed by Chloe Lamford. It was performed by Jan Pearson (as Lorraine) and Cathy Owen (as Marie). For the 2009 production, the cast was Maureen Beattie (as Lorraine) and Zawe Ashton (as Marie).

The Way Home  

Nick Hern Books
Type: Text

Chloë Moss's play The Way Home is a drama about the clash between suburban and itinerant ways of life in present-day Liverpool. It was first performed at the Everyman Theatre, Liverpool, on 20 October 2006.

The play's action revolves around two families in modern-day Liverpool: the Thompsons (Paul and Angela, and their 16-year-old son Bobby) and the O'Connors (Margaret, Felix, 18-year-old Ellie and 17-year-old Daniel). While the Thompsons live a fairly conventional family life, the O'Connors are Irish Travellers who live on an official Travellers’ site in Curzon Park. For them, there are no walls, just wheels, and a fierce sense of belonging that has nothing to do with place. But when Bobby starts skipping school to hang out with Danny, their friendship forces both families to look beyond the walls that divide them.

The premiere production was directed by Sue Dunderdale and designed by Bob Bailey. It was performed by Leanne Best, Claire Cogan, Luke Hayden, Amy McAllister, Nick Moss, Eamonn Owens and Joe Shipman.

Chloë Moss's plays have been staged at the Royal Court, Bush Theatre, Soho Theatre, Manchester Royal Exchange and Liverpool Everyman, amongst others. Her play This Wide Night won the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize. She also writes for television and radio.