Plays

After Haggerty

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

Gathering together the political and social concerns of an era, After Haggerty addresses with breadth and complexity the politics of theatre and personal liberation at a time when social certainties were being rapidly destabilised.

Bernard Link, a socialist middle-aged theatre critic, has leased a flat in London from Mr Haggerty without having met him. Claire, who is sharp, brittle and American, storms into the flat expecting to find the father of her child, but finds Bernard instead. He is having the flat done up by a couple of jobbing decorators, including an out-of-work homosexual actor. The unhappy cohabitation of this mixture of people is punctuated by excepts from Bernard’s pan-European lectures on Marxist theatre, cryptic telegrams from Haggerty in Paris, and the off-stage squalling of Claire and Haggerty’s baby, Raskolnikov. Then Bernard’s father visits, his reactionary, bigoted views clashing with what suddenly feels like a household.

After Haggerty was first presented in 1970 at the Aldwych Theatre, London.

audio After the Fall

LA Theatre Works
Type: Audio

Arthur Miller’s famous autobiographical drama takes place inside the tortured mind of a 40-year-old lawyer. Quentin is haunted by his disastrous affair with a needy sex symbol - a character rumored to be based on Marilyn Monroe, Miller’s second wife.

Featuring: Amy Brenneman, Anthony LaPaglia, Amy Pietz, Amy Aquino, Gregory Itzin, Claudette Nevins, Natalija Nogulich, Al Ruscio, Raphael Sbarge, Kenny Williams

Armstrong's Last Goodnight

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

Armstrong’s Last Goodnight opens on the border of Scotland and England in the year 1530, where a group of officials are meeting to hammer out a peace agreement between their two countries. The final bone of contention is the continued cattle raids carried out on English landowners by Scots living on the border. The commissioners dispatch Sir David Lindsay to end the raids by placating the main offender, John Armstrong of Gilnockie.

First presented by the National Theatre in 1964, Armstrong’s Last Goodnight demonstrates John Arden’s mastery of epic theatre as he employs song, verse, and wit to tell the tale of a man who confronts authority and goes head to head with the consequences of doing so.

Ars Longa Vita Brevis

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

In their introduction to the play, authors Margaretta D'Arcy and John Arden say of Ars Longa Vita Brevis: 'This little piece is not exactly a play, nor is it anything else in particular. If we must call it something, it might well be termed "A Theme for Variations."'

A satirical play, Ars Longa Vita Brevis draws comparisons between education and military conquest, suggesting that the result of both is the suppression of individual expression, and, ultimately, the death of the individual, as seen in the life of the martially-minded art master Mr Miltiades. The free rein the authors give to the possibility for production is in marked contrast to the damning, and ultimately damned, techniques of the protagonist of the piece.

The Arsonists

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

Fires are becoming something of a problem, but Biedermann has it all under control. A respected member of the community with a loving wife and a flourishing business, he believes nothing can get to him. Being the great philanthrope, he is happy to fulfil his civic duty and give shelter to two new houseguests, and when they start filling the attic with petrol drums he’ll help them wire the fuse.

Max Frisch’s parable about our accommodating the very thing that will destroy us premiered at the Royal Court in 1961. The Arsonists was first presented in this translation by Alistair Beaton at the Royal Court Theatre Downstairs, London, on 1 November 2007, in a production directed by Ramin Gray.

audio Barefoot in the Park

LA Theatre Works
Type: Audio

A brand-new lawyer and his bride have returned from their honeymoon and are moving into a new apartment. Once there, they find the place is bare of furniture, the paint job is wrong, the skylight leaks and wacky neighbors keep popping up! A classic!

Includes an interview with Marc Masterson, the Artistic Director of South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, California. Before joining South Coast in 2011, Marc was the Artistic Director of the Actors Theatre of Louisville for eleven seasons, and programmed the prestigious Humana Festival of New American Plays. During his tenure in Louisville, Marc directed a number of classic and contemporary works, including a highly-praised production of Neil Simon’s Barefoot in the Park.

An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring Norman Aronovic, Laura Linney, J. Fred Shiffman, Judy Simmons and Eric Stoltz.

Featuring: Norman Aronovic, Laura Linney, J. Fred Shiffman, Judy Simmons, Eric Stoltz

The Beggar or The Dead Dog

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

As a young university student in Munich, Bertolt Brecht was only a few years away from early success as a playwright when he wrote five one-acts. Of these plays, only one was performed in his lifetime, and none were published until after his death. They provide a retrospective look at Brecht before his evolution into the founder of epic theatre, demonstrating some of the tendencies that would mark his later work.

In The Beggar, a beggar dares to speak the truth to an emperor when the emperor descends to complain about the smell. It was neither produced nor published during the author’s lifetime.

Black Mass

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

Black Mass is a concise and crucial satire set in a church in Vereeniging, South Africa. As he takes communion, the Prime Minister practises his justification for forcibly moving on a group of black people who have gathered to protest. Bond uses potent imagery and satire to discuss the Sharpeville Massacre of 1960, when police opened fire on a crowd of protestors, killing 69 people.

The play originally formed part of a sequence written for the Sharpeville Massacre Tenth Anniversary Commemoration Evening, held by the Anti-Apartheid Movement at the Lyceum Theatre, London, in 1970.

Bones

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

In a rundown porn cinema in 1960s Gateshead, two Jewish brothers are at war with each other. Their business is on the verge of bankruptcy and they owe a shedload of money to a local gangster. But all their problems seem to be over when one of them kidnaps Reggie Kray . . .

Sharp, uncompromising and witty, Bones is a deliciously dark comedy about family ties, gangland warfare and a man in a dress.

Bones premiered at Live Theatre, Newcastle in 1999.

The Catch

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

As a young university student in Munich, Bertolt Brecht was only a few years away from early success as a playwright when he wrote five one-acts. Of these plays, only one was performed in his lifetime, and none were published until after his death. They provide a retrospective look at Brecht before his evolution into the founder of epic theatre, demonstrating some of the tendencies that would mark his later work.

When a fisherman’s wife is woken up by her drunk husband and his friends, anger and resentments explode. The Catch was neither produced nor published during the author’s lifetime.