European drama

Plays

Boom Bang-A-Bang

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

It’s 1995, it’s the Eurovision Song Contest and Lulu’s ‘Boom Bang-a-Bang’ is the soundtrack to this exuberant conjuration of a Eurovision party that starts as camp and ends as farce, though there is a real power to Harvey’s discussion of sexuality.

Norman the lonely neighbour upstairs is trying every trick in the book to get himself invited to the party, but it is strictly for close friends only. In fact, it’s really just for people who knew Michael, Lee’s deceased boyfriend, as the couple used to host the best Eurovision parties and Lee wants to honour his memory. But most of his friends have opted for a rival party, and so Lee is left with his sister Wendy, the camp and irrepressible Steph, the gorgeous raver Roy, and the sparring couple Nick and Tanya. And the evening he had planned, full of kitsch, Bucks Fizz and douze points, goes astray amid the covert love affairs, accidental fires, memories and tears.

Boom Bang-A-Bang was first performed in 1995 at the Bush Theatre, London.

Bouncers (1990s Remix)

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

Bouncers by John Godber shows a night on the tiles from the point of view of the men on the door. It is a funny, energetic piece of highly theatrical storytelling where the men are at once themselves, and every character they happen to meet on a night at work at the nightclub.

In his introduction, the author writes: 'In many ways the content informed the form. The boredom of the men on the door spills over into grotesque violence and fantasy. The antics of the girls and boys out for a night on the town hardly need developing to make them dramatic. The conflict between those wanting a good time and those stopping a good time from being had is a basic dramatic premise . . . the central theme of Bouncers is universal: men after beer after women, and the beat goes on.'

Bouncers premiered at the Edinburgh Festival in 1984. This revised version was first presented by the Hull Truck Theatre Company in 1991.

The Boy Who Fell into a Book

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

Rockfist Slim's enemies have just plunged him into yet another desperate situation when Kevin has to close his detective book and go to sleep. But his own adventure is only just beginning. Fast-moving, fun and full of special effects, Ayckbourn's wonderfully inventive play for children brings alive several well-known children's books as Kevin and Rockfist Slim escape the baddies and plunge into many different worlds.

The Boy Who Fell into a Book premiered at the Stephen Joseph Theatre, Scarborough, in December 1998.

audio Breaking the Code

LA Theatre Works
Type: Audio

Based on the book ALAN TURING: THE ENIGMA by Andrew Hodges.

Simon Templeman stars as brilliant mathematician Alan Turning, the man who cracked the German Enigma code and enabled the Allies to win World War II. But Turing was to find that the country he saved cared less about his genius and more about his sexual orientation.

An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring: Sheelagh Cullen as Sara Turing Kenneth Danziger as Detective Mick Ross Peter Dennis as John Smith Samantha Robson as Pat Green Orlando Seale as Ron Miller W. Morgan Sheppard as Dillwyn Knox Andre Sogliuzzo as Christopher Morcom and Nikos Simon Templeman as Alan Turing Directed by Rosalind Ayres. Recorded before a live audience at the Skirball Cultural Center, Los Angeles in July, 2003. Breaking the Code is part of L.A. Theatre Works’ Relativity Series featuring science-themed plays. Major funding for the Relativity Series is provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to enhance public understanding of science and technology in the modern world.

Featuring: Sheelagh Cullen, Kenneth Danziger, Peter Dennis, Samantha Robson, Orlando Seale, W. Morgan Sheppard, Andre Sogliuzzo, Simon Templeman

The Break of Day

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

In The Break of Day Timberlake Wertenbaker turns a sharp and beady eye on three women and their partners. The century is coming to an end and a feeling of dissatisfaction and unease seizes the group. Is it too late to have children? Were they wrong to focus so much on work? These questions force each of them to recast their future.

The Break of Day premiered in an Out of Joint production at the Haymarket Theatre, Leicester, in 1995.

Breezeblock Park

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

Set on a Liverpool Housing estate in the run up to Christmas, Breezeblock Park is a comedy about the ups and downs of family life. Betty is preparing the decorations for her guest, and making her house neat and tidy for her guests. But what she hopes will be a respectable Christmas gathering of her daughter Sandra, brother Tim and sister Reeny, becomes a maelstrom of drunken bickering and petty recriminations when Sandra reveals the shocking news that she is pregnant.

One of Russell's first plays, Breezeblock Park was first presented in 1975 at the Everyman Theatre, Liverpool before transferring to London that same year.

Brewers Fayre

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

David Greig: Plays 1 brings together four key plays by the playwright described by the Daily Telegraph as 'one of the most interesting and adventurous British dramatists of his generation'.

In Outlying Island two young Cambridge ornithologists are sent to a remote island. Together with its authoritarian leaseholder and his niece they observe an innocence that is about to be destroyed forever. San Diego offers a strange and occasionally nightmarish journey into the heart of the contemporary American dream, weaving together stories of illegal immigrants, of film stars and whores, and even of the playwright himself. Pyrenees follows a man found lying in the snow in the foothills as he tries to piece together his identity. In The American Pilot a crash-landing in a remote valley in a distant country raises questions about how the world sees America and how America sees the world.

The collection also includes a trilogy of short plays, Being Norwegian, Kyoto and Brewers Fayre, published here for the first time.

Outlying Island

'I can't recommend it highly enough . A rich, charged play, veering between the comic and the poetic as innocence gives way to experience.' Telegraph

San Diego

'A surreal and intriguing piece of theatre . dazzling . Home and awake from the mythical dream that is San Diego, the name David Greig remains imprinted on our minds.' Independent

Pyrenees

'All the wit and intelligence of previous works, probing away at concerns that are both contemporary and timeless...A classy, rewarding, engaging drama, Greig's best to date.' The Times

The American Pilot

'One of the most intellectually stimulating dramatists around. A richly provocative new play.' Guardian

audio The Browning Version

LA Theatre Works
Type: Audio

In Terence Rattigan’s classic drama, an aging schoolmaster at an English secondary school faces the harsh judgments of his students, his fellow teachers, and his vicious and spiteful wife. But can a lone act of kindness from a sympathetic student change his heart?

This recording also includes an interview with Michael Darlow, the author of “Terence Rattigan: The Man and His Work”. An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring: Steven Brand as Frank Hunter Martin Jarvis as Andrew Crocker-Harris Ian Ogilvy as The Headmaster Darren Richardson as Peter Gilbert Devon Sorvari as Mrs. Gilbert Kate Steele as Millie Crocker-Harris Daniel Stewart as John Taplow Directed by Peter Levin. Recorded by L.A. Theatre Works before a live audience.

Featuring: Steven Brand, Martin Jarvis, Ian Ogilvy, Darren Richardson, Devon Sorvari, Kate Steele, Daniel Stewart

A Bucket of Eels

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

A Bucket of Eels is a skilful contemporary farce. A bridegroom runs away on the eve of his marriage and unleashes a sequence of increasingly bizarre events.

First staged 1994 by the RSC as a 'production without décor', and set on Midsummer's night A Bucket of Eels is a modern play with a classic edge, exploring the making and breaking of a relationship and the absurd interventions by fate and nature that defines it.

The Bundle: or New Narrow Road to the Deep North

Bloomsbury Publishing
Type: Text

The Bundle, or New Narrow Road to the Deep North is a compelling and forceful story exploring the origins and mechanisms of moral concepts through cruel ethical dilemmas.

Like Bond’s Narrow Road to Deep North, the play begins with the discovery of an abandoned child on a riverbank. The poet Basho who is searching for enlightenment protests that he cannot take it with him, so reluctantly the ferryman adopts the child though he can barely afford to feed another person. The play first describes the boy’s upbringing within the social values of his community, before turning to revolution to dissect and rework accepted attitudes and ideologies. The Bundle weaves together lives beset with social injustices and torn by agonizing choices, with the moral force of parable and the scope and depth of epic.

The Bundle was first performed in 1978 at the Warehouse Theatre, London.

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