British Theatre Companies: From Fringe to Mainstream

Plays

British Theatre Companies: 1965-1979

Bloomsbury Publishing

This series of three volumes provides a groundbreaking study of the work of many of the most innovative and important British theatre companies from 1965 to the present. Each volume provides a survey of the political and cultural context; an extensive survey of the variety of theatre companies from the period, and detailed case studies of six of the major companies drawing on the Arts Council Archives to trace the impact of funding on the work produced.

1965–1979, covers the period often accepted as the 'golden age' of British Fringe companies, looking at the birth of companies concerned with touring their work to an ever-expanding circuit of 'alternative' performance venues.Leading academics provide case studies of six of the most important companies, including:

* CAST, by Bill McDonnell (University of Sheffield, UK)

* The People Show, by Grant Tyler Peterson (Brunel University London, UK)

* Portable Theatre, by Chris Megson (Royal Holloway, University of London, UK)

* Pip Simmons Theatre Group, by Kate Dorney (The Victoria and Albert Museum, UK)

* Welfare State International, by Gillian Whitely (Loughborough University, UK)

* 7:84 Theatre Companies, by David Pattie (University of Chester, UK).

'A detailed, well researched history of what has happened in the industry in the last half century.' The Stage

British Theatre Companies: 1980-1994

Bloomsbury Publishing

This series of three volumes provides a groundbreaking study of the work of many of the most innovative and important British theatre companies from 1965 to the present. Each volume provides a survey of the political and cultural context, an extensive survey of the variety of theatre companies from the period, and detailed case studies of six of the major companies.

Volume Two, 1980–1994, covers the period when cuts under Margaret Thatcher's Tory government changed the landscape for British theatre. Yet it also saw an expansion of companies that made feminism and gender central to their work, and the establishment of new black and Asian companies.

Leading academics provide case studies of six of the most important companies, including:

* Monstrous Regiment, by Kate Dorney (The Victoria & Albert Museum)

*Forced Entertainment, by Sarah Gorman (University of Roehampton, London, UK)

* Gay Sweatshop, by Sara Freeman (University of Puget Sound, USA)

* Joint Stock, by Jaqueline Bolton (University of Lincoln, UK)

* Theatre de Complicite, by Michael Fry

* Talawa, by Kene Igweonu (Canterbury Christ Church University, UK)

British Theatre Companies: 1995-2014

Bloomsbury Publishing

This series of three volumes provides a groundbreaking study of the work of many of the most innovative and important British theatre companies from 1965 to 2014. Each volume provides a survey of the political and cultural context, an extensive survey of the variety of theatre companies from the period, and detailed case studies of six of the most important companies. Volume Three, 1995-2014, charts the expansion of the sector in the era of Lottery funding and traces the resistant influences of earlier movements in the emergence of new companies and an independent theatre ecology that seeks to reconfigure the mainstream. Leading academics provide case studies of six of the most important companies, including:

* Mind the Gap, by Dave Calvert (University of Huddersfield, UK)

* Blast Theory, by Maria Chatzichristodoulou (University of Hull, UK)

* Suspect Culture, by Clare Wallace (Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic)

* Punchdrunk, by Josephine Machon (Middlesex University, UK)

* Kneehigh, by Duška Radosavljevic (University of Kent, UK)

* Stans Cafe, by Marissia Fragkou (Canterbury Christ Church University, UK)

This series of three volumes provides a groundbreaking study of the work of many of the most innovative and important British theatre companies from 1965 to the present. It charts the movement of much of this work from the fringe to the mainstream of British theatre culture. Each volume provides an overview of the political and cultural context, an extensive survey of the variety of theatre companies from the period, and detailed case studies of six of the major companies.