Zinnie Harris

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Plays by Zinnie Harris

By Many Wounds

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

And it’s you, you’re standing on a step, looking like I remember you but a little older, and not nervous but like you belong. And wearing a stripy T-shirt and the yellow beret that you wore the summer before you left … and you don’t say anything for a second. Then suddenly you say ‘Sorry.’

A very ordinary family. An ordinary family holiday. Mum, Mike, Gill and Judy. And now Judy’s gone and nothing will ever be the same again.

By Many Wounds is an examination of ordinary lives made extraordinary through disaster. In this gripping story about love and loss, Zinnie Harris paints a haunting picture of a family coming to terms with grief and a child’s forced entry into early adulthood.

By Many Wounds was first presented at the Chelsea Centre, London, in November 1998.

Fall

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

Is the settling of scores a necessary step towards restoring peace after a bloody conflict?

Set against a war-crimes trial at the end of a civil war, Fall explores the thin line between justice and revenge.

Fall is the last play in a trilogy by Zinnie Harris that examines the transforming effects of war. Solstice and Midwinter were performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company in 2004-05. Fall opened at the Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, in July 2008.

Further than the Furthest Thing

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

On a remote island in the middle of the Atlantic secrets are buried. When the outside world comes calling, intent on manipulation for political and economic reasons, the islanders find their own world blown apart from the inside as well as beyond. Further than the Furthest Thing is a beautifully drawn story evoking the sadness and beauty of a civilisation in crisis.

Further than the Furthest Thing premiered at the Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh in August, 2000.

Midwinter

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

A pedlar announces that the war is over and as the soldiers return in the fragile peace that follows, the starving people are left to build new lives, to forge new identities. Written in a spare and lyrical language, Midwinter is a play about now, about love, self and a world made from conflict.

Midwinter premiered as part of the RSC New Work Festival at the Swan Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon, in October 2004. It is the second in a trilogy of plays which begins with Solstice and culiminates in Fall.

Nightingale and Chase

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

Played this game. Inside, with the other girls. The 'he is going to meet you' game. The 'he is going to meet you with flowers' game. The 'he is going to turn up in a limo' game. The 'he is going to bring champagne' game. The 'he is going to cover you in kisses, or cum, or love bites or bloody Belgian chocolate' game, doesn't matter but when you walk out of those gates. He is going to be there, that is the game.

Chase is waiting to be released from prison. And Nightingale is there to meet her. Everything is under control and they're both going to get it right. This time.

Nightingale and Chase premiered at the Royal Court Theatre, London, in September 2001.

The Wheel

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

A man is banished in a soldier's hearing. His daughter is left to wander. In a rash moment, Beatriz offers to take the child back to her father, and so starts an unimaginable journey across continents and in and out of war zones. But in their need to survive, the woman and the child transform in ways that become irreversible.

The Wheel premiered at the Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, in August 2011 in a production by the National Theatre of Scotland. The play won the Amnesty International Freedom of Expression Award 2011.

Zinnie Harris’s plays include the multi-award winning Further than the Furthest Thing (National Theatre/Tron Theatre; winner of the 1999 Peggy Ramsay Award, 2001 John Whiting Award, Edinburgh Fringe First Award), How to Hold Your Breath (Royal Court Theatre; joint winner of the Berwin Lee Award), The Wheel (National Theatre of Scotland; joint winner of the 2011 Amnesty International Freedom of Expression Award), Nightingale and Chase (Royal Court Theatre), Midwinter, Solstice (both RSC), Fall (Traverse Theatre/RSC) and By Many Wounds (Hamsptead Theatre). Her previous adaptations include Ibsen’s A Doll’s House for the Donmar Warehouse and Stringberg’s Miss Julie for the National Theatre of Scotland. Zinnie received an Arts Foundation Fellowship for playwriting, and was Writer in Residence at the RSC, 2000–2001. She is a part-time Senior Lecturer in playwriting at St Andrews University, and the Associate Director at the Traverse Theatre.