Samuel Adamson

Plays by Samuel Adamson

Drink, Dance, Laugh and Lie

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

No one has recognised Reade Collins in the street for over a decade. Suddenly everyone seems to know who he is again – things are looking up. But there's a flip side to second-hand fame – and Reade discovers that there's more than one way of getting shafted. Drink, Dance, Laugh and Lie is a wildly entertaining look at the nature of celebrity.

Drink, Dance, Laugh and Lie premiered at the Bush Theatre, London, in 1999.

Gabriel (Adamson)

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

This is noisily Protestant England - the England of William and Mary's Glorious Revolution at the end of a century of civil strife. This is London in the 1690s, the monster city tamed into awe by our only Orpheus: Henry Purcell.

Monarchs, princes, prostitutes, wigmakers, composers, tapsters, musicians, transvestites and watermen jostle for attention in the teeming, unruly world of late seventeenth-century London, where enthralling stories both real and imagined merge and intersect.

Gabriel premiered at Shakespeare's Globe, London, in July 2013 with Alison Balsom, one of the world's finest trumpeters, performing the music of Purcell and Handel.

Mrs Affleck

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

I know. No country matters. Not in the kitchen.

Not on a Sunday. Not in England.

After six lonely weeks with nobody but her disabled boy for company, Rita Affleck, wealthy, beautiful and consumed by jealous love, welcomes home her husband Alfred. But, far from the passionate reunion she so craves, there is only torment as Alfred's possessive half-sister arrives, and he announces his great revelation.

I want things how they were ... My perfect poet ...

1945, one afternoon in London - on the floor,

every last undiluted drop of you.

Taking Ibsen's Little Eyolf as the inspiration for a passionate and tragic tale of obsessive love, set in 1950s England, Samuel Adamson's Mrs Affleck opened at the National Theatre, London, in January 2009.

Running Wild

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

For Lilly and her mother, going to Indonesia isn’t just another holiday. It’s an escape and a new start. But when Will takes a gentle ride along the beach on an elephant called Oona, calamity strikes. As a tsunami comes crashing towards them, Oona charges deep into the jungle, her young rider desperately clinging on. Miles from civilisation, there’s wonder, discovery and treetop adventures among the orang-utans. But then as Lilly’s thoughts turn to his mother left behind on the beach, tigers prowl, hunger hits, and she must learn to survive the rainforest.

Samuel Adamson’s adaptation of Michael Morpurgo’s novel Running Wild was premiered by the Chichester Festival Youth Theatre in 2015. It received its professional premiere in May 2016, in a Regent’s Park Theatre and Chichester Festival Theatre co-production.

Running Wild was winner of Best Show for Children and Young People at the 2015 UK Theatre Awards.

Southwark Fair

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

Simon is looking forward to lunch with Patrick Mulligan, the first man he slept with nearly twenty years previously, while playing Puck in a school production. It soon becomes apparent that Patrick is expecting to see not Simon, but the boy who played Lysander, and their lunch is cut short. When Simon is approached by Patrick's wife the situation becomes increasingly tortured and darkly comic.

Southwark Fair premiered at the National Theatre, London, in February 2006.

Samuel Adamson's plays include: Some Kind of Bliss (Trafalgar Studios), All About My Mother (from Almodóvar; Old Vic), Fish and Company (Soho Theatre/National Youth Theatre), Southwark Fair (National Theatre), Drink, Dance, Laugh and Lie (Bush Theatre/Channel 4), Grace Note (Peter Hall Company/Old Vic), Clocks and Whistles (Bush Theatre) and contributions to the 24 Hour Plays (Old Vic), A Chain Play (Almeida Theatre) and Urban Scrawl (TheatreVoice/Theatre 503). Adaptations include: Ibsen's Pillars of the Community and Mrs Affleck, from Ibsen's Little Eyolf, (both at the National Theatre) A Doll's House (Southwark Playhouse); Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard (Oxford Stage Company/Riverside Studios) and Three Sisters (OSC/Whitehall Theatre); Schnitzler's Professor Bernhardi (Dumbfounded Theatre/Arcola Theatre/Radio 3) and Bernhard Studlar's Vienna Dreaming (National Theatre Studio). Radio includes: Tomorrow Week (Radio 3). Film includes Running for River (Directional Studios/Krug). He was Pearson Writer in Residence at the Bush in 1997-8.