Lucy Caldwell

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Plays by Lucy Caldwell

Leaves

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

We are where we come from?' That's not true. That's not true because if that's true there's no hope for any of us.

Lori is coming home from her first term at university. It's only been a few weeks and already things have gone badly wrong. But none of the rest of the family knows, or understands, what really happened.

In this fiercely observed family drama, three teenage girls struggle to define who they are, and why, and where they might be going.

Leaves won the George Devine Award 2006, the premier award for new writing by an emerging playwright in the UK and Ireland. The play opened at the Druid Theatre, Galway in March 2007 before transferring to the Royal Court Theatre, London.

Notes to Future Self

Faber and Faber
Type: Text

Judy's my mum. It's an understatement to say she's a bit of a hippy. I mean who else but a New Ager calls their baby 'Philosophy Rainbow'? I try to go by 'Sophie'.

Sophie and Calliope have never been to school. Their mum ran away from home when she was seventeen to join the New Age movement and the girls were raised in a series of ashrams, communes and impromptu raves.

When Sophie gets ill, they return to Birmingham – a strange new world where meditation and tree-hugging are replaced with maths homework and TV and the grandmother they have never met. And it's against this bewildering new backdrop – the normality she's always longed for – that Sophie must come to terms with her mortality.

Lucy Caldwell's Notes to Future Self opened at the Birmingham Repertory Theatre in February 2011.

Born in Belfast in 1981, Lucy Caldwell read English at Queens' College, Cambridge and is a graduate of Goldsmith's MA in Creative & Life Writing. She is the author the novels Where They Were Missed (2006) and The Meeting Point (2011), which featured on BBC Radio 4's Book at Bedtime and was awarded the Dylan Thomas Prize. Her stage plays, Leaves, Guardians, and Notes to Future Self, and radio dramas, Girl From Mars, Avenues of Eternal Peace, Witch Week, have won awards including the George Devine Award and the Imison Award. In 2011 she was awarded the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature for her body of work to date.